Silent Tuesdays

Early films were never really silent at all. From the very beginning, in the late nineteenth century, they practically always featured live music, performed by orchestras and organists in the largest theaters, and by pianists everywhere else. Therefore, our popular ongoing series Silent Tuesdays is really anything but silent. Both canonized silent classics and recently discovered wonders are accompanied live by our resident pianist and composer, Philip Carli, who just happens to be one of the world’s greatest specialists in this delicate area of expertise. A great picture, projected on 35mm film, plus a great concert? Only at the Dryden.

Special support provided by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Date:
Tuesday, November 21, 2017
Time:
7:30 p.m.
Location:
Dryden Theatre
Capra | Silent Tuesdays. Harry Langdon is one of the great silent comedians, but one who has been always difficult to classify; his persona of a childlike man is actually very complex and ambiguous, two elements that give his comedy an unusual edge and constant surprise. His considered reactions to mayhem and his thoughtful but ineffectual attempts to interact with the world around him (not to mention his genuine astonishment when he actually has to deploy his somewhat obscure maturity) make him a fascinating figure.
Date:
Tuesday, November 28, 2017
Time:
7:30 p.m.
Location:
Dryden Theatre
Silent Tuesdays. Chiyokichi, a young man, hates Cooper, an American who looks down on the Japanese. Chiyokichi picks Cooper’s pocket and is caught. He is brought to Cooper’s house and becomes his slave, and a riveting tale of passion, hatred, and revenge unfolds.
Date:
Tuesday, December 5, 2017
Time:
7:30 p.m.
Location:
Dryden Theatre
Silent Tuesdays. Maurice Chevalier became an overnight film sensation in his first sound feature Innocents of Paris; his sophistication, insouciance, overwhelming charm, and natural comedic ability made him the first international star created by the new medium of talking pictures. Whereas Innocents of Paris had only a few songs created for Chevalier centered on a thin plot, Paramount went all out for his second film, The Love Parade.