RIP Romero

To commemorate the recent death of George A. Romero (1940–2017), godfather of the modern zombie genre and one of the most original and influential horror directors, the Dryden will screen three of his early classics. With the goal of presenting Romero’s work as much more diverse and complex than it is usually thought to be, we will follow his acclaimed debut Night of the Living Dead (1968) with The Crazies (1973) and Knightriders (1981). The Crazies, his second horror film, left no doubt that the subversive political undertones of Night of the Living Dead were no accident and that Romero was reinventing the genre by infusing it with lethal sociological critique. Romero’s strangest, most personal, and probably most underrated film, Knightriders is a romantic road-drama about the importance of staying true to one’s personal ethics and beliefs (and it catapulted Ed Harris to stardom). It represents a perfect metaphor for George A. Romero’s creative path that persistently refused to bend under numbing demands of the market and remained fiercely independent until the end.

Date:
Wednesday, November 1, 2017
Time:
7:30 p.m.
Location:
Dryden Theatre
RIP Romero. Our homage to George A. Romero begins at the beginning, with his debut feature Night of the Living Dead, the film that first unleashed flesh-eating zombies on the mainstream. Steeped in pop-culture iconography, Romero’s low-budget masterpiece and staple of drive-in culture continues to shock audiences with its no-holds-barred approach to an age-old legend. 
Date:
Wednesday, November 15, 2017
Time:
7:30 p.m.
Location:
Dryden Theatre
RIP Romero. A military plane crashes in Evans, Pennsylvania, releasing a deadly virus that affects the infected in one of two ways: death or insanity. As the germ rapidly infests the small town, armed forces are called in to restore order, but when they, too, catch the bug, a chaotic guerrilla war ensues, sending scientists on a desperate search for a cure.
Date:
Wednesday, November 29, 2017
Time:
7:30 p.m.
Location:
Dryden Theatre
RIP Romero. Fans of Romero’s Living Dead cycle may be surprised to learn that one of the late master’s finest films isn’t a horror movie at all.