90 Years of Academy Awards, continued

Our January and February tribute to the Academy Awards focused on an eclectic choice of Best Pictures. In March and April, we are extending it to include eight historic laureates in the Best Foreign Language Film category.

When eminent French filmmaker Leos Carax received the Los Angeles Film Critics Association award for Best Foreign Film (Holy Motors) in 2013, he famously delivered the following appreciation speech: “Hello, I’m Leos Carax, director of foreign-language films. I’ve been making foreign-language films my whole life. Foreign-language films are made all over the world, of course, except in America. In America, they only make non-foreign-language films. Foreign-language films are very hard to make, obviously, because you have to invent a foreign language instead of using the usual language. But the truth is, cinema is a foreign language, a language created for those who need to travel to the other side of life. Goodnight.”

Bitter irony aside, the Academy’s consideration of foreign films (however limited in scope and patronizing) did help immensely in spreading certain global cinematic trends, aesthetics, and politics beyond the national borders of their source. And, numerous filmmakers—major artists like Akira Kurosawa, Federico Fellini, Ingmar Bergman, and Vittorio De Sica (all part of our series)—can be grateful to the Academy for the international renown and place in film history they enjoy today.

Date:
Thursday, March 1, 2018
Time:
7:30 p.m.
Location:
Dryden Theatre
Academy Awards at 90. In this founding film of the neorealist movement, director Vittorio De Sica notably used non-actors, including Lamberto Maggiorani, an unemployed steelworker, as Ricci, a poster-hanger who relies on his bicycle to make a living. While he is busy with his son Bruno, the bicycle is stolen, and the two begin a desperate search for the thief.
Date:
Wednesday, March 7, 2018
Time:
7:30 p.m.
Location:
Dryden Theatre
Academy Awards at 90. Director Akira Kurosawa and his star Toshiro Mifune gained international fame and awakened the world to the importance of Japanese cinema with this story of murder told through the eyes of four different characters. 
Date:
Tuesday, March 13, 2018
Time:
7:30 p.m.
Location:
Dryden Theatre
Academy Awards at 90. Recipient of the honorary Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1950, The Walls of Malapaga is one of those films once respected as prime examples of high-quality French cinema, only to be then quickly (and perhaps unfairly) almost completely forgotten in favor of a much louder, younger generation of French filmmakers.
Date:
Thursday, March 15, 2018
Time:
7:30 p.m.
Location:
Dryden Theatre
Academy Awards at 90. The cinema of Fellini is marked by a passion for life often revealed in the glowing face of the director’s wife, Giulietta Masina, who stars here in one of his finest films. Masina is Gelsomina, a pantomime artist in the spirit of Chaplin, who, being sold to strongman Zampanò (Anthony Quinn), serves as his dutiful assistant and eventually develops a genuine affection for the brute.
Date:
Saturday, March 17, 2018
Time:
7:30 p.m.
Location:
Dryden Theatre
Academy Awards at 90 | Member Movie. Fellini’s rapturous masterpiece stars the director’s parallel persona Marcello Mastroianni as a filmmaker lost in life, unable to find the motivation for his next movie.
Date:
Saturday, March 24, 2018
Time:
7:30 p.m.
Location:
Dryden Theatre
Academy Awards at 90. Director Akira Kurosawa and his star Toshiro Mifune gained international fame and awakened the world to the importance of Japanese cinema with this story of murder told through the eyes of four different characters.
Date:
Wednesday, March 28, 2018
Time:
7:30 p.m.
Location:
Dryden Theatre
Academy Awards at 90. In 14th-century Sweden, two goat herders assault a peasant girl. Later, the assailants seek food and shelter at the home of their victim’s parents (Max von Sydow and Birgitta Valberg), who exact a cunning revenge. 
Date:
Friday, March 30, 2018
Time:
7:30 p.m.
Location:
Dryden Theatre
Academy Awards at 90. Armed with a toy drum and a voice that can shatter glass, young Oskar Matzerath (David Bennent) navigates pre–World War II Germany from the eyes of a child.
Date:
Wednesday, April 4, 2018
Time:
7:30 p.m.
Location:
Dryden Theatre
Academy Awards at 90. Fellini’s rapturous masterpiece stars the director’s parallel persona Marcello Mastroianni as a filmmaker lost in life, unable to find the motivation for his next movie.
Date:
Saturday, April 7, 2018
Time:
7:30 p.m.
Location:
Dryden Theatre
Academy Awards at 90. Fanny and Alexander, a stunning family saga set in turn-of-the-century Sweden, focuses on the lives of half a dozen characters over the course of a year. The theatrical version re-edited from the original television series is a virtual compendium of the themes, situations, characters, and images present in Bergman’s other works.