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In their quest to bring natural-looking color to moving images, the Technicolor scientists had to concern themselves not just with dyes and cameras, but with all aspects of filmmaking and exhibition. One area that they explored was the film projector’s light source.

Submitted by Kate Meyers Emery,

George Eastman and friends seated around fireplace

Richard Renaldi: Manhattan Sunday is officially open at the Eastman Museum. Learn more about the exhibition and its digital features that will allow you to immerse yourself within Manhattan Sunday, inlcuding an instagram takeover, sountrack to the series, and audio tour. 

Submitted by Jesse Peers,

George Eastman and friends seated around fireplace

Eastman’s most regular vacations were his triannual trips down to Oak Lodge, his rustic hunting retreat in Halifax County, North Carolina. By 1917, Oak Lodge consisted of 2,500 acres “of wonderfully diversant rolling land, wooded with pines…and a great variety of hard woods.”

Submitted by Kate Meyers Emery,

Image of Ektachrome package

Last week at the Consumer Electronics Show, Kodak made a huge announcement. Bigger than Super 8, bigger than the Ektra smartphone... They are re-introducing Kodak Professional Ektachrome Color Reversal Film again! The re-released film series will support 135-36x camera formats and be available at the end of 2017. The film stock has a distinctive look and was the choice of many photographers before it was discontinued in 2012. Because it is color positive, it generates a positive image that can be viewed or projected once it is exposed and processed, a benefit that makes it suitable for printing, scanning and projecting. 

Submitted by Bruce Barnes,

Image of a clock reading 7:30

The Dryden Theatre is the George Eastman Museum’s venue for exhibiting motion pictures that represent the entire history of the medium. Few film theaters of its kind remain.

Submitted by Guest Post,

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Spencer Churchill, a recent graduate of the two-year Masters program in film preservation from Selznick School at the George Eastman Museum and current staff member, shares the work he is doing to record and preserve films from the Indian Cinema Collection. 

Submitted by George Eastman Museum,

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Beginning in early November each year, the George Eastman Museum fills with the smell of gingerbread, royal icing and candy. This year, we wanted to give those who can’t be here to smell the gingerbread and experience this local tradition a special treat from Scratch Bakeshop.

Submitted by Guest Post,

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Today's blog post is authored by Ken Fox and Kelsey Eckert, project archivists in the Moving Image Department at the George Eastman Museum. In honor of the 101st birthday of Technicolor, they will be sharing behind-the-scenes stories and insights from the work they are doing to digitize the documents from the early days of the Technicolor Company. 

Submitted by Bruce Barnes,

Image from Sight Reading exhibit

With the recent launch of a new platform, more than a quarter of a million objects from the George Eastman Museum’s world-class collections are now accessible online at eastman.org/collections-online. You can search or browse our collection in ways never before possible. More objects from the museum’s vast holdings— including films and other objects from the cinema collection—will be added to the museum’s website on an ongoing basis.

Submitted by Kate Meyers Emery,

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In this final post in a series, we share the story behind the framing and display of two photograms created by Floris Neüsuss. 

Submitted by George Eastman Museum,

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In this second post in a series, we share the story behind the re-discovery, conservation and display of two photograms created by Floris Neüsuss. With an understanding as to what these two images were, our next step was to have conservator Zach Long examine them and in coordination with curator Lisa Hostetler determine the scope of the treatment required for display.

Submitted by George Eastman Museum,

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In this first post in a series, we share the story behind the re-discovery, conservation and display of two photograms created by Floris Neüsuss. In May 2016, while looking through the photography vault in the museum, Lisa noticed for the first time that the large piece of black wood at the end of a large blue metal shelving unit had a label on the top of it. What she noticed in particular was the name written on the label: Floris Neüsuss.

Submitted by Jesse Peers,

Catherine Opie Takeover

Eastman’s biggest public moment of 1916 came when he made a political speech to an audience of about 4,000 people at Convention Hall on October 19th. The occasion was a rally for the Business Men’s League and Hughes Alliance (Charles Hughes was the Republican candidate for President that year) and Eastman was tasked with introducing Dr. David Jayne Hill who spoke on “industrial preparedness” - the need for the US to look ahead to a postwar world and to defend its commercial interests.

Submitted by Kate Meyers Emery,

Catherine Opie Takeover

In honor of our newest exhibition, Catherine Opie: 700 Nimes Road, over the course of the next week our Instagram account is going to be taken over by a diverse group of individuals from our community, who will share a portrait of themselves through their home and belongings.

Submitted by Bruce Barnes,

Nathan Lyons

Nathan Lyons, one of the most influential proponents of photography as fine art and as a field of academic study, passed away on August 31 at age 86. We are deeply saddened.

Submitted by Kate Meyers Emery,

Image from Sight Reading exhibit

Recently, Jamie M. Allen, associate curator of the Department of Photography, had the opportunity to speak with artist Catherine Opie. Her exhibition, Catherine Opie: 700 Nimes Road, will be on display at the George Eastman Museum beginning October 1, 2016.

Submitted by Kate Meyers Emery,

Image from Sight Reading exhibit

This Saturday, we will be celebrating the legacy of independent theaters as part of Art House Theater Day. According to their website, "In an age where media has become more digital than tangible, more solitary than social, art house theaters remain the physical spaces where film lovers congregate and connect with intrepid, creative filmmaking. They are the beating heart for new and exciting cinema that is shaping the future of the medium."

Submitted by Bruce Barnes,

Image from Sight Reading exhibit

The George Eastman Museum relies on volunteers in many aspects of our activities. We are deeply grateful to these individuals for their selfless contributions to our mission.

Submitted by Kate Meyers Emery,

Image from Sight Reading exhibit

Congratulations to all of the winners from our Sight Reading Instagram Challenges, and thank you to everyone who participated. We really enjoyed see the diverse range of photographs and how well you were able to capture photographs based on the five concepts. 

Submitted by Guest Post,

Nathan Lyons

Lisa Hostetler, Curator in Charge of the Department of Photography remembers Nathan Lyons, as a photographer, presence in the Rochester arts community, and source of inspiration. 

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